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Crazy things people did during pandemics in the past-part 1

Pandemics are usually a time of mass hysteria or paronia. Crazy or fake prescriptions on how to escape infection comes from sources that are usually never known.

In the covid-19 pandemic, you have heard about: drink ginger, drink warm water, drink chloroquine, expose patients to ultraviolet light, or take a disinfectant injection. Unbelievably, the last three prescriptions came from the intemperate President of the United States. According to him disinfectants “knock out the Corona virus in one minute.”

Mr Trump.

In one US state emergency lines were overwhelmed with callers who wanted to know if they should inject themselves with bleach as suggested by President Trump. Now medical authorities and bleach manufacturers are scrambling to get the word out against the use of bleach for prevention or cure of covid-19.

Man remains man despite the great stride in knowledge. Over the next few days Newspackng will bring you a few crazy things people did years back during pandemics, courtesy, The History Collection.

The Black Death
The Black Death, a pandemic, killed about a 30% of Europe’s population in the mid-fourteenth century. Victims usually died within a few days, that were spent suffering from horrific symptoms like gruesome boils, bloody lungs, severe vomiting, and high fevers that sent the infected into delirium.

Between the rapid spread, scary symptoms, and high mortality rates, people were understandably driven to panic. Combine that with the poor state of medical knowledge, and it is unsurprising that many latched on to crazy cures that did not work, and only served to increase the victims’ suffering.

Public sewer

Living in Sewers (gutters)
Most plague cures were based on superstition, ignorance, and dubious logic of the kind that put two and two together to come up with nine. An example is the line of reasoning that took people from figuring that the plague – or some variants thereof – was airborne, and the solution: head to the sewers, (gutters).

People began visiting, and sometimes even living in, stinky sewers. It was thought that the sewers’ horrible stench would discourage the clean but disease ridden air from coming near them. Not only did it not work, it also made those visiting and living in the sewers susceptible to other illnesses caused by their vile surroundings.

Don’t be a victim of voodoo cures. Listen only to medical advice from the right sources.

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Publisher and Editor-in-Chief, Newspackng.
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